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emsarts

Frieze is the world’s leading platform for modern and contemporary art for scholars,connoisseurs, collectors and the general public alike. Frieze comprises three magazines—frieze, Frieze Masters MagazineandFrieze Week—and four international art fairs—FriezeLondon, Frieze Masters, Frieze New York and Frieze Los Angeles.Frieze was founded in 1991 by Matthew Slotover and Amanda Sharp, with the launch offrieze magazine,the leading international magazine of contemporary art and culture. In2003, Sharp and Slotover launched Frieze London art fair, which takes place each October inThe Regent’s Park, London. In 2012, they launched Frieze New York, which occurs each Mayin Randall’s Island Park, and Frieze Masters, which coincides with Frieze London in Octoberand is dedicated to art from ancient to modern. In 2018, Frieze launched Frieze Los Angeles,which opened February 14–17, 2019 at Paramount Pictures Studios, Los Angeles. In 2016, Frieze entered into a strategic partnership with Endeavor a global entertainment, sports and content company.

Felix was co-founded by Dean Valentine and brothers Al Morán and Mills Morán. The fair’s mission is to create an intimate experience that prioritizes connoisseurship, collaboration, and community. A return to the hotel fair format, in the spirit of the storied Gramercy International Los Angeles at the Chateau Marmont, Felix grants galleries an efficient exhibition opportunity while offering the city’s collector-base intimate access and maximum flexibility. The informal setting allows for more extended conversations among collectors, dealers, and artists alike. In 2019, the inaugural edition of the fair welcomed a diverse creative audience, bringing in over 12,000 guests to experience galleries from Europe, North America, China, South Africa and Australia. The 2020 edition takes place February 13-16 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel in Los Angeles.

– for more information on additional images from this event please contact EMS at emsartscene@gmail.com or Instagram at @ericminhswenson

LOS ANGELES, CA- (January 18, 2019)- LA’s international contemporary art fair will celebrate its 10th anniversary with new visual branding, a reimagined floor design, as well as new “Salon” and Publishing sections. ALAC will bring together international contemporary galleries, collectors, curators, artists, and art enthusiasts for an extended five-day cultural event from Wednesday, February 13-Sunday, February 17. Over ten years, ALAC has helped to solidify Los Angeles as an art epicenter, nurtured a generation of young collectors, and acted as a gateway to international exchange. ALAC’s unique combination of emerging and established galleries has been key to its longevity and success. ALAC maintains an unparalleled commitment to art-making, collection-building, and the galleries that are the bridge between the two. ALAC’s 10th Edition will introduce the next generation of galleries, while continuing to partner with the most exciting established programs in the city. PRESS ACCREDITATION All requests for credentials must be made before Friday, February 8, 2019 to alac@lynwinter.com Members of the media are invited to preview the fair on Wednesday, February 13 from 2pm. Advance press tours can be arranged by appointment. Tim Fleming, ALAC’s Founder and Fair Director said, “After ten years, I recognize the impact we have made locally and internationally. To walk into a collector’s home and see a work from a past edition of our fair is such a pleasure, because it solidifies for me how we’ve achieved our mission by supporting galleries and informing collections. Our 10th anniversary is a chance for us to recommit to who we are: content-forward, trusted but inventive, international and LA. Our work is really about putting together the best program of established and emerging galleries, to show off the best of LA and around the globe. We feel spoiled by the number of visionaries we get to collaborate with, from new galleries with audacious programming to respected partners we’ve worked with from ALAC’s beginning a decade ago.” For the new visual identity of the fair, ALAC has teamed with award-winning graphic designer and artist Brian Roettinger (WP&A), whose roster of clients includes music visionaries Mark Ronson, Florence + the Machine, Drake, and Jay-Z. Inspired by the fair’s physical venue at the Santa Monica Airport, the experience of navigating an art fair on foot, and the civic architecture of LA’s freeways, ALAC’s new branding explores the language of way-finding. Roettinger comments, “The new bold black and white identity is a modular typographic system. It allows for a strict but playful mix, which is part airport way-finding and part motor transportation. The look focuses on the fair’s better-known name ‘ALAC,’ instead of its official full name, which the team felt was a natural decision after ten years of existence.” For its tenth anniversary edition, ALAC will be housed within a new architectural design by principal architect at Seattle-based firm Olson Kundig Jerry Garcia, who has collaborated with world-renowned artists such as Anish Kapoor, Jaume Plensa, Oscar Tuazon, and Doug Aitken. Claudia Rech, Berlin-based art historian, curator, and former gallerist of Gillmeier Rech, will curate a “Salon” section called “The Academy,” offering a new way for galleries and the public to participate in the fair through a curated exhibition. Frances Horn, Brussels-based curator and initiator of the art book fair PA/PER VIEW at WIELS, has been selected to lead the ALAC publishing section, “Movable Types.” More details on the architectural design as well as the Salon and Publishing sections to come.

– for more information on additional images from this event please contact EMS at emsartscene@gmail.com or Instagram at @ericminhswenson

 

SPRING/BREAK Art Show Los Angeles premiered during Frieze Week LA in February 2019, featuring 45+ projects of near-exclusively Los Angeles-based artists, curators, and artist-run spaces. For press responses to the event, go to our NEWS section.

SPRING/BREAK Art Show returns for its 2nd Exhibition under the 2020 theme, IN EXCESS.

February 14 – 16, 2020  //  Skylight ROW DTLA  //  757 South Alameda Street, Los Angeles

Parking within the ROW DTLA

EXHIBITORS INCLUDE: Alessandra de Benedetti   Amy Silver   Azikiwe Mohammed   BA Contemporary Art   Caris Reid  Chandran Gallery   Chris Bors   Christopher Lynn   Cortney Stell   Desert Center   Durden and Ray   Eva Pfeffer + Sarah Heinemann   Evan Snyderman   Fall On Your Sword   FEMMEBIT + SUPERCOLLIDER   Gallery1993   Gas Gallery  Greg Haberny  Hilde Lynn Helphenstein   IV Gallery   ::JACOB’S WEST::   Jason Ramos   Jen Dunlap   Judy Brodsky  Khang Nguyen  Kylie Manning   Lauren Powell   Lauren Xandra   Leila Jarman   Maripol   Melissa Godoy-Nieto + Clara Claus  Mickey Sumner   Nathan See   New Art Projects   The New Arts Foundation   Nicklas Stewart   Outback Arthouse   Patrick Geske   Sadaf Padder   Sara Driver   Sarah Bereza   Secret Project Robot   Superposition Gallery   Tara De La Garza  Teresa Eggers   Tiger Strikes Asteroid LA  TRANSFER LA

– for more information on additional images from this event please contact EMS at emsartscene@gmail.com or Instagram at @ericminhswenson

 

We know what you’re thinking, “Been there, done that.” We’re happy to tell you that photo l.a. is an entirely different experience.

We’re bringing the best of the photography world to your doorstep with a collaborative platform that links dealers and collectors with a gamut of galleries from around the globe. Internationally recognized, yet abundantly accessible, photo l.a. cultivates connections between industry elite and up-and-coming talent alike. The longest running international photographic art fair on the West Coast, photo l.a. has been in operation for nearly three decades.

photo l.a. received a new home in the historic Barker Hangar this year. The airplane hangar’s soaring vaulted ceilings, arched steel trusses, and sweeping 35,000 square foot event space will host a roster of 65-75 local and international galleries and dealers, collectives, leading not-for-profits, art schools, and global booksellers.

– for more information on additional images from this event please contact EMS at emsartscene@gmail.com or Instagram at @ericminhswenson

Venice, CA — L.A. Louver is pleased to present an exhibition of prints by Los Angeles artist Alison Saar. For the past 30 years, Saar has maintained a robust printmaking practice, creating more than 90 prints over the course of her career. Addressing issues of race, gender and spirituality, Saar’s lithographs, etchings and woodblock prints are evocations of her sculptures, powerful depictions of figures carved from wood or cast in bronze, that are articulated with found objects – material artifacts enriched with a narrative all their own. As such, a focused selection of sculptures will be installed in dialogue with Saar’s prints, in L.A. Louver’s second floor gallery and open-air Skyroom. As an activity maintained in connection to and in tandem with her sculpture making, Saar undertakes printmaking with the same tangible approach to unconventional materials and methods. Cast-off objects like old chair backs and found ceiling tin become the foundations for etching or lithography plates. Carved panels used for woodblock prints echo the techniques established in her hewn wooden forms. A direct comparison between Saar’s sculptures and prints can be seen in the juxtaposition of White Guise Print (2018-19), a woodblock print of a woman holding an iron dripping with blood, and Sugar (2018), a sculpture of a young girl clasping a machete, her figure carved from wood and surfaced with reclaimed ceiling tin. Both are similarly expressed with the same forward stance, simple dress and cotton branches tethered to their hair. But more than subject matter, they possess a corporeal presence, embodied through an assertive use of materials and a continuity of mark-making across mediums. Saar created these as part of a series inspired by the character of Topsy from Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin. However, in Saar’s revisionist account of the story, the slave girl spurns any attempts at pacification and instead takes up arms using her tools of labor. In addition to printing on paper, Saar repurposes worn fabrics that she has collected over time, embracing tears and stains that point to evidence of use. When conceiving these prints, Saar considers the nature of the cloth to inform the content of the imagery. In Redbone Blues (2017), a striking portrait of a young man is printed directly onto a vintage handkerchief, his likeness an imaginary rendering of the handkerchief ’s original owner. Breach (2017) portrays a nude female figure steering a raft through rising waters, burdened by her belongings. Saar applied the imagery onto fabric sourced from linen seed sacks, a material not unlike the sandbags used to fortify the levees during the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927. This subject was initially realized in a large sculpture that Saar created prior to the print. The translation from a three-dimensional to a flat representation affords Saar FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 2020 Media Contact: Darius Sabbaghzadeh Email: darius@hellothirdeye.com White Guise Print, 2018-19, woodcut, relief, shellac-stained paper, handtainted iron, 55 x 27 1/2 in, (139.7 x 69.9 cm) 29 January – 29 February 2020 Reception for the artist: Wednesday, 29 January, 6-8pm the opportunity to further establish surroundings, atmosphere and environs. Saar states, “Making a 2-D work meant I could introduce all these other things that couldn’t be part of a sculpture… Here, I could dictate that context, create a scene, a tableau, a narrative.” For Saar, printmaking has become an integral part of her artistic practice, where she can experiment and collaborate with master printmakers from Tandem Press, Tamarind Institute, Mullowney Printing and others. Moreover, the process offers Saar the ability to holistically contemplate themes addressed in her sculptures and paintings. “Printmaking allows me to step back from the real physical work of sculpting,” says Saar. “I think of making prints as an intermezzo, a time to go back and reflect, and maybe rework ideas. Carving woodblocks can be tiring, but it’s nothing like the chainsaws. Making prints has become a resting period, like a lave tet, or a cleansing of the mind.”

 

– for more information on additional images from this event please contact EMS at emsartscene@gmail.com or Instagram at @ericminhswenson

 

Mining images from mass media, advertising and entertainment since the late 1970s, Richard Prince has redefined the concepts of authorship, ownership, and aura. Applying his understanding of the complex transactions of representation to the making of art, he evolved a unique signature filled with echoes of other signatures yet that is unquestionably his own. An avid collector and perceptive chronicler of American subcultures and vernaculars and their role in the construction of American identity, he has probed the depths of racism, sexism, and psychosis in mainstream humor; the mythical status of cowboys, bikers, customized cars, and celebrities; and most recently, the push–pull allure of pulp fiction and soft porn, producing such unlikely icons as the highly coveted Nurse paintings.

Richard Prince was born in 1949 in the Panama Canal Zone. Prince’s work has been the subject of major solo exhibitions, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (1992); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California (1993); “Fotos, Schilderijen, Objecten,” Museum Boymans–Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1993); Haus der Kunst / Süddeutsche Zeitung, Munich (1996); Museum Haus Lange / Museum Haus Esters, Germany (1997); “4×4,” MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Vienna (2000); “Upstate,” MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Schindler House, Los Angeles (2000); Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Basel (2001, traveled to Kunsthalle Zurich, Switzerland; and Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, Germany); “American Dream, Collecting Richard Prince for 27 Years,” Rubell Family Collection, Miami (2004); “Canaries in the Coal Mine,” Astrup Fearnley Museum, Oslo (2006); “The Early Works,” Neuberger Museum of Art, New York (2007); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2007, traveled to Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and Serpentine Gallery, London, through 2008); “American Prayer,” Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris (2011); “Prince/Picasso,” Picasso Museum, Spain (2012); and “It’s a Free Concert,” Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria (2014). Prince’s works are in the public collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas; Museum of Fine Arts Collection, Boston; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Prince currently lives and works in New York.

 

Blum & Poe is pleased to present New Images of Man curated by Alison M. Gingeras.

This exhibition revisits and expands upon the Museum of Modern Art’s eponymous 1959 group exhibition curated by Peter Selz that brought together artists whose work grappled with the human condition as well as emerging modes of humanist representation in painting and sculpture in the wake of the traumatic fallout of the Second World War.

Some sixty years have passed since New Images of Man presented key figures of the European neo avant-garde such as Alberto Giacometti, Jean Dubuffet, César, Francis Bacon, and Karel Appel alongside the ascendant figures of the American art scene such as Willem de Kooning, H.C. Westermann, and Leon Golub. Set against the backdrop of existentialist philosophy and the socio-political anxieties of the postwar period, the esteemed humanist philosopher Paul Tillich wrote of these artists in the original MoMA catalogue, “Each period has its peculiar image of man. It appears in its poems and novels, music, philosophy, plays and dances; and it appears in its painting and sculpture. Whenever a new period is conceived in the womb of the preceding period, a new image of man pushes towards the surface and finally breaks through to find its artists and philosophers.”

Part homage, part radical revision, this two-floor presentation reconstitutes emblematic figures from the original MoMA line up of artists while simultaneously expanding outwards to include those of the same generation and period who were overlooked in the midcentury. This reprisal features forty-three artists hailing not only from the US and Western Europe, but also Cuba, Egypt, Haiti, India, Iran, Japan, Poland, Senegal, and Sudan. The overwhelming maleness of the original New Images of Man has been amended by foregrounding previously excluded women artists from the same generation. Had gender politics of the 1950s been less misogynist, Selz might have considered artists such as Alina Szapocznikow, Niki de Saint Phalle, Yuki Katsura, Carol Rama, and Lee Lozano. With the benefit of inclusive hindsight, Gingeras strives to present a fuller range of this humanist struggle, thus more acutely enacting the original curator’s vision to gather a range of “effigies of the disquiet man.”

As the capstone to this historical proposition, the exhibition argues for the contemporary resonance of this midcentury disquiet by judiciously including a selection of contemporary artists. These living artists are also “imagists that take the human situation, indeed the human predicament” as their primary subject, while also reflecting the legacy of the aesthetic concerns from the original period. Spanning painting and sculpture, this contemporary component includes works by Paweł Althamer, Cecily Brown, Luis Flores, Michel Nedjar, Greer Lankton, Miriam Cahn, Sarah Lucas, Dana Schutz, El Hadji Sy, Ahmed Morsi, Henry Taylor, amongst others.

Installed alongside these paintings and sculptures, historic and contemporary, are interventions that evoke the larger-than-life figures from the original show—de Kooning, Dubuffet, Bacon, Giacometti, Westermann. Playful tributes to these masters appear throughout the exhibition, including two wall murals by Los Angeles artist Dave Muller.

Embedded at the center of this revisionist enterprise is another historical MoMA exhibition also founded upon postwar humanism—this time through the lens of photography. The 1955 exhibition Family of Man curated by Edward Steichen—the legendary director of the Photography Department at MoMA—was conceived four years before Peter Selz’s New Images of Man, and was devised as a celebration of the camera as a powerful, immersive tool for the promulgation of images as well as the affirmation of the universal human experience. While it debuted in New York in 1955, Family of Man went on a veritable world tour. According to Steichen’s 1963 memoir A Life in Photography, between 1955 and 1962 about nine million viewers all around the world had the opportunity “to see themselves reflected” in the 503 photographs of people, making it the most popular photography exhibition ever.

As the legacy of Steichen’s curatorial endeavors lives on in contemporary visual culture, this section of the exhibition sets out to challenge the Western-centric bias of the original show. This reassessment of Steichen’s conceit focuses upon two women artists from the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The Polish, self-taught photographer Zofia Rydet was active in the mid-1950s yet she was separated from Steichen not only by the Iron Curtain. This redux presentation of Rydet’s photographic oeuvre suggests a more complex vision of postwar era humanist photography. In fact, after seeing Steichen’s Family of Man show in Warsaw, Rydet embarked upon her series of documentary images of children in the literal rubble of the Second World War in the early 1960s entitled Mały człowiek (Little Man). This presentation features a selection of Rydet’s photographs from her documentary series called the “Sociological Record” in which she captured thousands of ordinary households in Poland from 1978 until her death in 1997.

Rydet’s reworking of the Steichen paradigm finds a jarring echo in the contemporary oeuvre of Deana Lawson—an artist whose intimate, yet iconic imagery immortalizes African-American family life. Lawson grew up in Rochester, New York, the birthplace of Kodak—her involvement with photography is deeply bound up with her family’s history and their entwinement with the photographic industry. Unlike Rydet, Lawson’s images are often staged while they strive to capture the magic and textures of everyday struggles, emotions, and plain existence. Her gaze intrepidly focuses upon members of the African diaspora while also crafting stunning formal compositions that hark back to classical painting.  As Lawson has said of her work, “I have an image in mind that I have to make. It burns so deeply that I have to make it.”

Shown side by side in a scenography that references Steichen’s original Family of Man presentation at MoMA, Rydet’s communist-era documentation of Polish families in their humble interiors resonates uncannily with Lawson’s present-day portraiture. Despite being decades apart, culturally disparate, and approaching their medium with radically differing methods, both Rydet and Lawson create images that offer a sharp rebuttal to Steichen’s sentimental and melodramatic original opus. Both photographers share a quality that Lawson has articulated when speaking of her own work, creating images that are “thick with space, layered with otherness and belonging at the same time.” Together Rydet and Lawson provide a revisionist twist to this new Family of Man. This section of the show was curated in collaboration with Antonina Gugała with a new installation by Deana Lawson made especially for the show.

While much has changed in social and political terms since the 1950s, we are arguably again in a period of immense existential questioning and profound collective anxiety—artists now, as then, are on the frontlines of confronting what it means to be human, therefore making New Images of Man a subject still urgent for contemplation and provocation. This past summer, Selz died at the age of one hundred. In his New York Times obituary, his daughter Gabrielle remarked, “He would say that everything—a somber painting by Rothko or a Rodin sculpture—was about the human condition. My dad responded to emotion.” Arguably, emotion is the gravitational force that draws us to images of other people—from prehistoric cave paintings to press photographs of detained refugees and children on the Mexican-American border, humans find empathetic connection, solace, or simple recognition in the act of contemplating depictions of other humans. In the spirit of Selz’s original aim, this restaging of New Images of Man and reimagining of Family of Man resolves to recontextualize artists’ agency in addressing the fundamental questions of the human condition and to discourage apathy about our fellow humans’ plight.

While an art exhibition can only operate on a symbolic and discursive level, the impetus behind the new New Images of Man is to continue our collective rumination on the human condition with renewed emotional and intellectual urgency. By expanding the geopolitical and generational scope of artists, an expansive vision of humanity starts to emerge—broadening “man” to a more intersectional vision of human existence.

– for more information on additional images from this event please contact EMS at emsartscene@gmail.com or Instagram at @ericminhswenson

For over 25 years, Huma Bhabha (b. 1962, Karachi, Pakistan) has been making objects, drawings, and other works that depict the strangeness and vulnerability of the contemporary figure. Her hybridized forms, which borrow from ancient and modern cultural sources alike, exude pathos and humor, going straight to the heart of the most pressing issues of our time. Posing questions about the alien qualities of unfamiliar beings, and the criteria by which lifeforms are considered monsters, Bhabha locates the point where science fiction, horror, modernist form, and archaic expression intersect. The timelessness of her objects is enhanced by her technical mastery and her creative approach to her materials, by which she draws attention to the similarities and differences between natural and manmade substances. In monumental outdoor projects for public spaces, meanwhile, she uses bronze to stage large-scale mediations on nature, war, and civilization’s ancient past and distant future.

Huma Bhabha (b. 1962, Karachi, Pakistan) has been the subject of solo exhibitions at institutions that include the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2019); The Contemporary Austin, Texas (2018); the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, where We Come In Peace, an installation of large-scale sculptures, was a Roof Garden Commission (2018); David Roberts Art Foundation (2017); MoMA PS1, Long Island City, New York (2012); Collezione Maramotti, Reggio Emilia, Italy (2012); and Aspen Art Museum, Aspen, Colorado (2011). Among the many group exhibitions in which she has participated are the Yorkshire Sculpture International (2019); Carnegie International, 57th Edition, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh (2018); and All the World’s Futures, 56th Venice Biennale (2015). Bhabha’s work is in the permanent collections of the Centre George Pompidou, Paris; Hammer Museum Los Angeles; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among other institutions. She lives and works in Poughkeepsie, New York.

– for more information on additional images from this event please contact EMS at emsartscene@gmail.com or Instagram at @ericminhswenson

GAVLAK Los Angeles is pleased to announce Meta Minimal, a solo exhibition of new sculpture by Gisela Colon (American b. 1966, Vancouver, Canada; raised 1967, San Juan, Puerto Rico). The artist’s second solo exhibition with the gallery will open at Gavlak’s new space in Downtown Los Angeles at 1700 South Santa Fe Avenue, Suite 440, on January 11, 2020.

Through her syncretic process of exploring and expanding upon past history, sculptor Gisela Colon has succeeded in creating sculptures that convey the fullest possible array of sensory and intellectual experience, projecting cosmic energy and power outwards into the world. With her astute practice of Organic Minimalism– an idiosyncratic sculptural language that imbues life-like qualities into reductive forms– Colon approaches her sculptural practice from the expansive perspective of phenomenological concerns: addressing the physical laws of the universe such as gravity, time, movement, energy and transformation. Colon’s oeuvre is the result of a synthesis of pointed historical reflection and visceral raw energy.

Colon’s practice of Organic Minimalism simultaneously expands and challenges the legacies of Light and Space, Minimalism, Kinetic and Latin American Op Art, merging industrial inertness with transformative biological mutability. Her sensual, gender-ambiguous sculptural forms further connect her practice to a history of female artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Yayoi Kusama, Linda Benglis and Judy Chicago. By channeling Bourgeois’ notions of sexualized energies and Chicago’s nascent feminist atmospheric works, Colon similarly posits her sculptures as vehicles for conversion of classic masculine forms into feminized power.

Colon’s vocabulary of organic forms and humanized geometries embodies a feeling of energy, movement, and growth that stems from the artist’s connection to the Earth, the vital energy that pervades all living organisms, and the extensive, infinite forces that rule the cosmological realm. For Colon, what is most important in a work of art is that it “transcends the material to allow for metaphysical phenomena.”

A merger of scientifically advanced technologies and materials with naturally-occurring in vita properties places Colon squarely in the current international discourse of contemporary sculpture. Contemporaries such as Olafur Eliasson, Alicja Kwade, Jose Davila, and other practitioners, alongside Colon, integrate the use of ubiquitous industrial materials of the Anthropocene era with the palpable tension of the laws of physics that pervade the invisible world around us.

For the Meta Minimal exhibition, Colon’s works will occupy the entirety of the gallery, centering the installation on one of Colon’s signature large-scale aerospace Monoliths, sculpted in iridescent carbon fiber. At 12 feet tall, Colon’s Untitled (Projectile Monolith White Iridium), 2019, stands as a force of gravity around which all other sculptures effortlessly float in synergistic movement. In Colon’s words:

“The Monoliths convey evidence of equality, power, beauty, and strength. By appropriating classic masculine forms and symbols (the phallus, bullets, missiles, rockets) and making them aesthetically ambiguous and even beautiful, the Monolith sculptures subvert the traditionally aggressive and destructive references of these objects. Their negative meanings are transmuted into positive energies, by converting them into aesthetically desirable objects that address phenomenology and the universal concern of human relationships with the Earth.”

Interspersed throughout the gallery, the viewer will also encounter a series of translucent, refined Hyperbolic Monoliths, part of a new body of work entitled Unidentified Objects, which references cosmological origins and otherworldly enigmas. Like stalagmites forcefully growing upwards from the mineral earth, or foreign matter hailing inexplicably from unknown worlds, the 8–foot-tall streamlined Hyperbolic Monoliths act as sinewy reminders of our stardust origins, creating bodily experiences through the activation of surrounding space.

Surrounding the Monoliths, several wall sculptures from Colon’s groundbreaking series of biomorphic Pods will hover as beacons of light and life. The Pods are created through a unique fabrication method comprised of blow-molding and layering of acrylic and optical materials of the 21st century. This technique results in sculptures that emanate, refract, and reflect light while simultaneously possessing fluid spectral color and optical harmony. Activated by light and their surrounding environment, the Pods become perceptual objects whose physical characteristics are transformed by variable factors such as the position of the viewer, their source of light, and the time of day.

Anchoring the central gallery space, Colon’s large-scale 8-foot-long amorphous floor work, entitled Unidentified Object (Slaboid Incandescent Gold), 2020, protrudes from the floor as if growing out of the concrete, presenting a direct aesthetic counterpoint in both organic form and manifested purpose to the forceful verticality of the Monoliths. These objects, though apparently conceptually opposed, emanate from the same transformative world, sharing a primitive kinship with the fundamental aspects of life.

Extending into the east gallery space, Colon presents a subtle immersive installation with a series of Light Portals where highly refined linear swaths of light and color appear to float seamlessly on the wall. Through the elusive shifting of prismatic refractions of structural color, the disembodied Light Portals allow for glimpses into the infinite.

Presented together, all four bodies of Colon’s work, foster a symbiotic dialogue, evoking the physical states of matter that fluctuate between solid, liquid and gas. Meta Minimal evidences a dynamic encounter with the universal forces of energy that surround us, leading to an experience beyond perception– an encounter with the sublime.

– for more information on additional images from this event please contact EMS at emsartscene@gmail.com or Instagram at @ericminhswenson

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